Photo of the Frontex Headquarters in Warsaw, Poland Foto/EPA
Photo of the Frontex Headquarters in Warsaw, Poland Foto/EPA

The European Border and Coast Guard Agency, also known as Frontex, has announced that it will be organizing its own charter flights to speed up repatriation of migrants who have been refused asylum in Europe. The UNHCR has said that large-scale repatriations are a sign that migration management "has failed."

 The European Border and Coast Guard Agency, also known as Frontex, will soon be organizing its own charter flights to speed up repatriation of migrants who have been refused asylum in Europe. The announcement was made by Frontex executive director Fabrice Leggeri in a hearing before the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) of the European Parliament, saying that close cooperation and planning with member states would be necessary to this end.

Measure due to ''worrisome'' situation

Leggeri said that there was a large gap between the number of migrants requesting international protection and those who actually get it, saying that it is ''worrisome'' that those who don't get it end up remaining.For this reason, he added, discussions are underway with the European Asylum Support Office to improve information exchange in order to make sure that those who are refused asylum can immediately be inserted into the deportation system. 'Repatriation a sign of failure', UNHCR In commenting on the EU's focus on repatriation policy, Ben Lewis from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said that large-scale repatriation is a sign that the system to manage migration has failed. In Brussels, he added, the word 'repatriation' is used in a ''clinical manner, outside of its context'' and repatriation ''is a violent process for those subjected to it''. The word 'repatriation', he added, ''is a euphemism for expulsion of unwanted people''.        

 

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