Yemeni children and women waiting to receive their families' free food rations from a local charity in Sana'a | Credit: EPA/YAHYA ARHAB
Yemeni children and women waiting to receive their families' free food rations from a local charity in Sana'a | Credit: EPA/YAHYA ARHAB

The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) has reported that "the mood in Hodeidah" in Yemen "is one of resignation." The city is still torn by violence while food and primary goods are increasingly less accessible.

Ibraheem Al-Hadri, a member of the staff of the Norwegian Refugee council (NCR) in Hodeidha, Yemen, said that "the mood in Hodeidah is one of resignation." 

"There is no indication that the world is going to intervene, no promises that people will be protected from an onslaught," he noted, talking about the current situation in the city, torn by violence between warring factions. "It isn't that [the civil war in] Yemen is a forgotten crisis, it is just one the world chooses not to care about."

"Many of the people left in Hodeidah city don't have anywhere to go. They don't have enough money to live, let alone leave. The cost of food, water and transport are now completely unpredictable; if you can afford bread on Monday, there's no guarantee you will be able to on Tuesday'', he wrote. 

Call to end bloodshed 

NCR Secretary General Jan Egeland said ''bombs destroy families every day, yet this war is still allowed to go on. Civilians are under fire from all warring factions. If the offensive sweeps into Hodeidah city, tens of thousands of civilians risk being caught in the crossfire. If fighting blocks any more major roads, it will sever the lifeline to over 20 million Yemenis who depend on supplies through Hodeidah port to survive."

Egeland went on to say that "the US, UK, France, Iran and all the actors engaged in this war can and must put an end to the carnage. They must call on parties to drop their arms and start peace talks now."

Risk of famine 

The NGO reported that fighting around Hodeidah city took on a new dimension earlier this week with the advancement of Saudi-led coalition forces to the east of the city, cutting off major overland routes between Hodeidah and Sana'a. Ground clashes are continuing in districts south and east of Hodeidah city while shelling and airstrikes affect large parts of the governorates Sa'ada, Hajjah, Ibb and Taizz. 

Humanitarian organizations have documented over half a million people that have fled homes in Hodeidah since the escalation of violence along the west coast early in June. The lack of food and water at accessible prices risks tipping millions in famine, the Norwegian Refugee Council warned. 
 

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