A young boy gets his last morning bucket bath in front of his neighbors in the Soweto area of Kibera, Africa's most populous slum, in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: EPA/STEPHEN MORRISON
A young boy gets his last morning bucket bath in front of his neighbors in the Soweto area of Kibera, Africa's most populous slum, in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: EPA/STEPHEN MORRISON

Authorities in Kenya have announced a plan to create a hotline to fight human trafficking in the country.

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has reported that authorities in Kenya have announced plans to create a hotline against human trafficking. The hotline is aimed at accelerating the response provided by local authorities and the Counter Trafficking in Persons (CTiP) secretariat, IOM said. 


The hotline will be the first of its kind in Kenya and will be based on the assistance provided in abuse cases against minors currently managed by the department for the social protection of minors. 

Focus on Kakamega district 

The hotline proposed was created by Kenya's Department of infancy services and the CtiP and was announced on November 7-8 during a workshop organized by the labor and social protection ministry and IOM, the UN agency for migration. The hotline will mainly focus on districts like the county of Kakamega, in western Kenya, at the border with Uganda. 

Kakamega is a county of origin and transit of trafficking victims and thus needs to raise awareness and promote cooperation to deal with the situation. Trafficking cases as such are difficult to manage because the incidents reported are often considered as ''child's theft'' in rural area, officials said. 

The program Better Migration Management 

The workshop held two weeks ago in Kenya focused on the activation of the National Referral Mechanism for the assistance of human trafficking victims. It included 31 participants and it was organized as part of the program Better Migration Management (BMM) which vies to improve the management of migration in the region, in particular to fight human trafficking from and inside the Horn of Africa. 

BMM is financed by the EU emergency trust fund for Africa and the German federal ministry for cooperation and economic development. The project is coordinated by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (Giz) and implemented through its partners, including IOM, Unodc, Expertise France, the Italian department of public security, Civipol and the British Council. The program is also active in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and South Sudan.
 

More articles