Slovenian police hold people back at the border crossing between Rigonce in Slovenia and Harmica in Croatia. | Photo: EPA/IGOR KUPLJENIK
Slovenian police hold people back at the border crossing between Rigonce in Slovenia and Harmica in Croatia. | Photo: EPA/IGOR KUPLJENIK

In Slovenia, police have been accused of breaching international law in dealing with applications for asylum. Police have rejected the claims.

Slovenia's Commissioner for Information, Mojca Prelesnik, has called on security forces to make public documents on the way migrants are treated at the border with Croatia. According to Prelesnik, the treatment and procedures for asylum requests were not in line with international legislation because applications were considered regardless of the applicants' country of origin. 


Issue raised after migrant testimony 

The lawsuit was first reported by the Slovenian daily Dnevnik, which asked to see the court document together with Amnesty International Slovenia. It managed to obtain only partial access to the document. The newspaper reported that police in 2018 did not allow some migrants to apply for asylum, although they all have the right to file an application. It said police sent them to Croatia, although there were no legal grounds for such a move. The issue was raised following testimony from a number of migrants now residing in Bosnia Herzegovina. However, police denied the allegations and refused to make the documents entirely public, citing reasons of security for Slovenia and the European Union. 

Slovenia ready to welcome five Sea-Watch refugees 

Last week, Slovenia said it was willing to accept five of the 49 migrants who landed in Malta after having spent two weeks in the Mediterranean aboard the German NGO vessels Sea Watch and Sea Eye. The vessels had not been granted a port in which to dock after rescuing the migrants, that is until last week's resolution in which Malta agreed to let the vessels disembark and a number of EU countries offered to take in various numbers of the migrants. In a statement, the Slovenian government said its gesture confirms its commitment to finding shared solutions to migratory questions in a vision of European Union solidarity.
 

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