A migrant demonstration in Piazza Castello in Turin. Sign in Italian says "We are all equal". Credit: ANSA/ALESSANDRO DI MARCO
A migrant demonstration in Piazza Castello in Turin. Sign in Italian says "We are all equal". Credit: ANSA/ALESSANDRO DI MARCO

Less than one Italian in three thinks that migrants are positive for the country, a percentage that is lower than the world average, according to a survey by the World Economic Forum.

Only 30 percent of Italians think migrants are "mostly good" for their country, compared to 63 percent in the US, 48 percent in Germany, and 56 percent worldwide, according to the World Economic Forum. 


On the eve of the annual World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, WEF released the results of a survey on a sample of 10,000 people from around the world regarding topics surrounding populism. 

Global public opinion "refutes populism" 

In general, the study found a refusal of populism. "Global public opinion emerges as strongly in favor of openness and collaboration" with varying degrees of "conviction", the survey conclusions said. On the question of how important it is for countries to work together on a shared objective, 76 percent of the total said it was "extremely or very" important. 

Response rates varied however, with 88 percent in East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, 61 percent in Western Europe, and 70 percent in North America. 

A similar trend was seen in response to a question about whether one's own country has a responsibility to help others (72 percent total, 94 percent Asia, 63 percent Western Europe). 

Data on immigration 

The percentages show notable differences among countries when it comes to immigration as well. While the total number of those who think immigration is "mostly good" for their country reached 56 percent, it dipped to 40 percent in Eastern European countries and increased only slightly in Western Europe, to 46 percent. 

The Italian figure, at 30 percent, was particularly low, while in North America the total was 66 percent, which the report said was "perhaps not surprising given their history". The study also addressed sustainability and reported that 54 percent of those surveyed said they have a high degree of trust in climate scientists. However, that rate was dramatically lower in North America, where only 17 percent of people responded affirmatively.
 

More articles