Refugees arriving in Rome via humanitarian corridor | Photo: ANSA
Refugees arriving in Rome via humanitarian corridor | Photo: ANSA

Between Wednesday and Thursday, some 77 migrants and refugees arrived in Rome through humanitarian corridors. Since February 2016, about 2,100 refugees have arrived in Italy - over 1,600 from Lebanon and 500 from Ethiopia - and about 500 in France, Belgium, and Andorra thanks to the humanitarian initiative.

On Wednesday morning, 40 Syrian refugees arrived at the Fiumicino airport in Rome, making the arrival over two days of 77 persons through humanitarian corridors complete.


The corridors were backed by the Comunità di Sant'Egidio, The Federation of Evangelical Churches (FCEI), and the Waldensian Church in agreement with the foreign and interior ministries.

After arrival, identification and first reception procedures were completed. A welcome ceremony was held in the presence of Comunità di Sant'Egidio chief Marco Impagliazzo, Paolo Naso for FCEI and the Waldensian Church, and representatives of the interior and foreign ministries. 

Since 2016 about 2,100 refugees have arrived in Italy 

Since February 2016, about 2,100 refugees have arrived in Italy. Of those, over 1,600 came from Lebanon and 500 from Ethiopia. About 500 others arrived in France, Belgium, and Andorra thanks to the humanitarian initiative. The new arrivals will be assisted by associations, parishes, communities and families in several Italian regions. Alongside the reception, Italian language courses will be immediately offered to adults and school to children. Job placement assistance will be available once refugee status has been granted. 

Evangelical Churches 'ready to welcome Sea watch migrants' 

''Let the 42 people onboard the Sea Watch disembark because they would immediately find a place in Catholic and Protestant reception communities, as well as in 50 German municipalities ready to take them in,'' said Paolo Naso during the welcome ceremony for the 40 refugees on Thursday. 

''It is a practical solution and one that is available,'' he added. ''There will never be a political solution, but a tangible one is possible.'' Speaking in front of a group of migrants, Naso then addressed the authorities and various political parties, calling for the Sea Watch issue to be ''depoliticized and seen instead as an issue that is exclusively humanitarian, allowing the 42 people onboard to get off the ship.''
 

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