Hungarian police officer on patrol observing migrants in Serbian territory from behind a fence at the border between Hungary and Serbia | Photo: EPA/ZOLTAN GERGELY KELEMEN
Hungarian police officer on patrol observing migrants in Serbian territory from behind a fence at the border between Hungary and Serbia | Photo: EPA/ZOLTAN GERGELY KELEMEN

Two tunnels were found in Hungary that were used by migrants to cross into the country from Serbia.

Hungarian police found two tunnels that were used by migrants to enter the country from Serbia. The tunnels allowed the migrants to avoid the metal barbed-wire border fence erected on the orders of Prime Minister Viktor Orban at the height of the 2015 migratory crisis along the Balkan route. 


Media in Belgrade on Friday said one of the tunnels was found in Asotthalom, in southern Hungary, just a few kilometres from the Serbian border, when 44 migrants were stopped as they were using the tunnel to cross into Hungary. 

The other tunnel was found near the Serbian border about 40 kilometres west of Asotthalom, in the village of Csikeria. 

Orban's chief of staff Djerdjerli Guljas, also cited by Serbian media, said the number of migrants who have illegally entered Hungary along its southern border with Serbia has grown significantly in recent months. 

Orban says Christians in danger, Europe not defending them 

Orban went back to attacking migratory flows into Europe in a speech last Wednesday at the 2nd International Conference on Christian Persecution held in Budapest. He said Christianity is in danger in Europe and the world, but European Union politicians are incapable of defending it. 

Orban said the main danger is mass Muslim immigration, which could also give Islam the upper hand. "In short, the Muslims could become the majority of the population" in Europe, Orban said. 

"Many good Christian politicians are working today in Europe, but they are forced into compromises in various coalitions, with hostile media, muzzled by political correctness, which is why they don't dare or don't want to express themselves clearly in favour of Christianity," said Orban, who leads the conservative right-wing populist Fidesz party. 

He said the situation is different in Hungary, "where there's no obligation of a coalition, the government is stable, and public opinion is hostile to migrants." 

The defence of Christianity is a battle cry for the Hungarian leader. On the European level, Orban belongs to the PPE party, which will make a decision in January on whether to allow his continued membership. In recent months Orban has softened his positions in order to avoid being expelled from the party.
 

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