A group of 64 Syrian refugees arrived at Rome’s Fiumicino airport last September thanks to a humanitarian corridor from Lebanon | Photo: ANSA/ Telenews
A group of 64 Syrian refugees arrived at Rome’s Fiumicino airport last September thanks to a humanitarian corridor from Lebanon | Photo: ANSA/ Telenews

Four Syrians in the same family arrived in Italy via a humanitarian corridor. Their integration will be overseen by a charity A Braccia Aperte (With Open Arms) in Turin.

A Syrian family of four people has been welcomed in Italy. The family's four members will be helped with integration over the next two years, thanks to the project ''A Braccia Aperte'' (With Open Arms) promoted by a number of charities including the Catholic order of Jesuits in Turin. 

Organizers of the project said this week that they will be providing accommodation to the Syrian family and helping them integrate over the next two years. 

The Syrian refugees had been living in a camp in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon and initially travelled from Lebanon to Italy in September last year thanks to humanitarian corridors. They have now arrived in Turin where they will be supported by the project. The aim of the project is to assist the family for the next two years and help them become financially independent. 

Project supported by several associations 

The project is supported by several groups and activists who joined forces. The idea initially came from some members of the Christian charity in Turin ''Comunità di Vita Cristiana/Lega Missionaria Studenti (Cvx/Lms)''. Their proposal was first extended to members of the umbrella group GeLaTo, including secular and Jesuit activists in the Piedmont city, as well as local volunteers. 

In just a few months, organizers said, promoters found enough volunteers and financial donors to start the project and welcome the Syrian family. 

School for children, Italian language course for parents 

The initiative also has the support of the cooperative Mediterranea Onlus, an organization that supports migrants on behalf of the diocese of Turin. Through this organization, the 50 financial supporters of the project will receive tax deductions from their donations. 

A group including 12 activists coordinates 40 volunteers who are helping the family integrate and build a new life. The children have started attending nursery school while their parents will soon start taking Italian language courses at the local CPIA, a provincial educational center for adults, organizers said. 

Meanwhile a team of volunteer teachers have started giving the family Italian lessons to prepare them for a journey that will lead them to the biggest challenge they have yet to face in Italy - finding a job.
 

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