Migrants at work on the archaeological site | Photo: ANSA
Migrants at work on the archaeological site | Photo: ANSA

An archaeological dig in southern Italy has also become an integration project for young asylum seekers. They are part of a project that uncovered over a hundred tombs from the third and fourth century.

An archaeological dig in Chiaramonte Gulfi, in the province of Ragusa in southern Italy, brought to light a necropolis from the third and fourth centuries A.D. It has also become an integration project for young asylum seekers, the project's promoters said on February 24. 

The asylum seekers, hosted at a reception center, are working together with students from the University of Bologna at the archaeological site. The dig has uncovered more than 110 tombs, as well as an abundance of funerary items, which leads archaeologists to believe that they belonged to a wealthy community of elevated social status.

An important archaeological discovery 

The university team is conducting scientific, historic, anthropological and genetic studies to understand the customs and lifestyles of the residents of 1,700 years ago. The academics are looking for elements that can allow for the study of the body and bone structure, the type of diet, and type of work. In one case, researchers are attempting to rebuild a face.

Asylum seekers participate in archaeological project

The cooperative Nostra Signora di Gulfi owns the site of the dig and also manages one of the SPRAR/SIPROMI migrant reception centers in the town of Chiaramonte. The cooperative stipulated an agreement with the city, the Ragusa Superintendency of Cultural Heritage, and the University of Bologna. For the project, work grants have been developed in collaboration with the superindendency. 
 

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