Courts across Germany have issued decisions in thousands of cases | Photo: Picture-alliance/dpa/F.Gentsch
Courts across Germany have issued decisions in thousands of cases | Photo: Picture-alliance/dpa/F.Gentsch

Administrative courts across Germany have issued repeals in 5,644 negative decisions of Afghan nationals seeking asylum in the first nine months of 2020.

Afghan asylum seekers lodged appeals in a total of 9,557 cases against negative decisions taken by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF). The success rate of the appeals, about 59%, was first reported last week by the Funke Media Group.

The report said another 3,778 cases brought by Afghan asylum seekers had been settled or were dealt with as part of the so-called Dublin regulation. In these cases, the decision issued does not reflect the strength of the asylum application itself, but rather addresses the question of which EU nation should be in charge of processing the application.

Read more: UN refugee agency urges global solutions for displaced Afghans

The numbers were publicized as a direct result of a parliamentary question submitted by the Left Party (Die Linke) in the Bundestag. Outspoken Left Party politician Ulla Jelpke said that she found it "unacceptable" that 59% of the BAMF decisions "turned out to be wrongful upon judicial review," adding that a change in policy was needed here.

Jelpke pointed out in particular that these cases should rather be reviewed fairly by BAMF, rather than putting a strain on Germany’s administrative courts.

Uncertain security situation in Afghanistan

It is uncertain to what extent the security situation in Afghanistan has played a role in those 5,644 repealed cases. Violence in the country has recently been on the increase again, despite the fact that the Taliban and the Afghan government are currently trying to negotiate a peace agreement.

Two attacks on educational facilities and a missile attack in Kabul have left more than 50 people dead in recent weeks.

with AFP

 

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