From file: The Supreme Court of Cassation in Rome | Photo: Alessandro di Meo/Archive/ANSA
From file: The Supreme Court of Cassation in Rome | Photo: Alessandro di Meo/Archive/ANSA

Italy's Supreme Court of Cassation has confirmed a life sentence for Osman M., known as Ismail, for killing and abusing detainees at the camp of Bani Walid in Libya. The judges said that the man killed at least six people and tortured and raped detainees "beyond any reasonable doubt".

The Supreme Court of Cassation (Corte Suprema di Cassazione) has confirmed a life sentence for Osman M., known as Ismail, for torturing, raping and killing detainees at the camp of Bani Walid in Libya. That's according to the motivation of the ruling published by the court on March 4.

The supreme court upheld the 2019 ruling of an appeals court in Milan which had sentenced the man to life, based on witness reports and on other evidence.

The Cassation said in the motivation that the torture, sexual violence, and murders committed by Osman M. were proven "beyond any reasonable doubt".

The six victims were beaten to death, according to evidence presented at the trial.

'Sincerity' in reports provided by Libyan migrants at hosting center

Ismail was identified by Libyan migrants who recognized him as their abuser at a hosting center in Milan in 2016, testifying in court about the violence they had endured. The violence was confirmed by medical exams carried out for the trial.

According to the Court of Cassation, which published on Thursday (March 4) the motivation of the sentence issued last October, the Milan judges carried out a "stringent and accurate screening of the victims' reports", comparing them with "results of investigations" during the trial.

The court said the the sentences of first instance and appeals on the case "are reassuring regarding the sincerity" of the victims' reports.

Also read: Milan court acknowledges torture in Libya detention camps

The motivations of the Cassation

The defendant's attorney had denied the truthfulness of the witnesses, claiming that the young man did not have sufficient autonomy at the camp to decide on the life and death of migrants and that he travelled to Italy under similar conditions as his accusers.

The Court of Cassation, instead, highlighted the "spontaneity, coherence, precision and detail" of reports provided by key witnesses at the trial as well as the "far from small" number of reports and exams carried out on the victims.

The violence was in fact committed by someone who, "after inflicting inhuman abuse on them, had crossed the Mediterranean with them and reached, like them, Europe's coast," the supreme court said.

The Court of Cassation added that the defense's claim that the man had become an abuser and killer because he was in turn being abused by someone else "is not supported by evidence".

 

More articles

Webpack App