From file: Italian President Sergio Mattarella visits the INMP outpatient clinic in 2016 | Photo: ANSA/Paolo Giandotti - Presidential Press Office
From file: Italian President Sergio Mattarella visits the INMP outpatient clinic in 2016 | Photo: ANSA/Paolo Giandotti - Presidential Press Office

On the occasion of International Women's Day, the Italian National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (INMP) launched the Women's Health and Protection Service in Rome. The service is a space for reception, information and prevention dedicated to the Italian and migrant women most in need of healthcare and psychological assistance.

The Italian National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (INMP) launched its new initiative, the Women's Health and Protection Service, on Monday (March 8) in Rome.

The service will provide a space for reception, information and prevention dedicated to the most vulnerable women and those most in need of healthcare and psychological assistance.

It includes a team composed of doctors, psychologists, nurses, social workers, cultural mediators and attorneys, whose goal is to provide Italian and migrant women with an awareness of their rights, especially the right to health.

Reception service

The service, which will operate from Monday to Friday at the INMP outpatient clinic in Rome, is open to women of any age and nationality and will rely on INMP workers' decades-long experience in providing assistance, according to INMP.

The women who choose to use the service will reportedly undergo a triage at reception, which will allow workers to connect them to the services best suited to respond to their needs.

The triage process will also help bring out, where necessary, that which is left unsaid, the issues that women find difficulty talking about, as often happens for example in cases of domestic violence, which have dramatically increased with the pandemic, according to INMP.

Training courses will be offered for workers and legal consulting will be available in cases where defence action needs to be taken or police complaints filed, working in collaboration with the local anti-violence network.

'Concrete help for redesigning oneself'

"Violence is not inevitable," said INMP health prevention director Massimiliano Aragona. "The transition from the image of the victim to that of taking on the responsibility for change is the crucial point for gaining distance from destructiveness," he said.

INMP psychologist Sonia Viale said the new service is "concrete help for redesigning oneself, for facing the self-destructive and destructive behaviors that violence generates."

 

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