Migrants at a reception center in the suburbs of Turin, Italy | Photo: ANSA/Tino Romano
Migrants at a reception center in the suburbs of Turin, Italy | Photo: ANSA/Tino Romano

In Italy, the number of residents and places at CAS migrant reception centers decreased significantly following the enactment of the 'migration and security decree' championed by former interior minister Matteo Salvini, according to a new report by two NGOs.

The organizations Actionaid and Openpolis published a report on Tuesday (March 16), saying that the so-called 'Salvini decree' led to the loss of more than 15,000 spots in small-sized CAS reception centers between December 2018 and December 2019; with the total number of places at these centers dropping from 49,487 to 34,005. Small centers reportedly lost the highest number of places following the decree's enactment.

47,000 fewer migrants at CAS facilities

The report -- called 'Una mappa dell'accoglienza' (a map of hospitality) -- found that the number of residents at reception centers shrank significantly following the enactment of the decree. The total number of CAS residents dropped from the 133,552 in 2018 to 87,201 in 2019, the two organizations said.

The number of municipalities with government-run centers or CAS facilities plummeted from 2,691 (33,8% of Italian municipalities) in 2018 to 1,822 (23%) the following year, down 32.3%, according to ActionAid and Openpolis.

Less money for reception centers

The report noted that if the over 49,000 spots in small centers in 2018 had remained open, migrants and asylum seekers could have been distributed more evenly across the territory. Small centers could have in fact accommodated well over half of the spots needed in 2019, the two organizations said.

It also reported that small centers received 22.7% less money per guest, from €35 to €27.

 

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