In the center: Italian interior minister Luciana Lamorgese, along with her counterparts from Spain, Greece, Cyprus, and Malta, at a press conference following the Med5 summit in Venice on June 4, 2022 | Source: TWITTER/ITALIAN INTERIOR MINISTRY
In the center: Italian interior minister Luciana Lamorgese, along with her counterparts from Spain, Greece, Cyprus, and Malta, at a press conference following the Med5 summit in Venice on June 4, 2022 | Source: TWITTER/ITALIAN INTERIOR MINISTRY

A planned total of 75,000 people are to be allowed to arrive in Italy for work according to the 2022 government decree. That's around 5,000 more than during last year's decree. Interior Minister Luciana Lamorgese said that there is a lack of personnel in specific sectors.

In Italy's 2022 decree on migrant quotas there will be over 70,000 posts: more than the previous year, when the number had been doubled compared with 2020. The reason, Interior Minister Luciana Lamorgese said, is that "there is a lack of personnel in specific sectors."

The announcement was made on Saturday (June 4), when the minister chaired a Med5-summit during which Mediterranean EU members Italy, Spain, Greece, Cyprus and Malta renewed calls for more robust migration policies across the union.

The need to increase the quotas was closely linked to the war in Ukraine and the risk that a grain crisis might lead to an unprecedented wave of migrants, Lamorgese said.

"Work is underway at the Cabinet to verify the possibility to speed up procedures, since there is a lack of personnel in specific sectors," she said, underscoring that the issue is the remit of the Cabinet.

More MoUs assessed after one on construction

As concerns the decree itself, the minister noted a Memorandum of Understanding signed on May 16 between Labor Minister Andrea Orlando and construction sector organizations to bring in 3,000 migrants that enjoy international protection into the sector. The document is currently being studied.

"We are looking at a similar MoU for other categories," she said.

The summit on Saturday -- which followed ones in Athens, Malaga and Rome -- included participation by Spanish interior minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska Gómez, Greek interior minister Notis Mitarachi, Maltese interior minister Byron Camilleri, and Cypriot interior minister Nicos Nouris, alongside Czech Republic minister Vít Rakušan, whose country will be taking on the EU's six-month presidency. In a videoconference was also French minister Gérald Darmanin.

"The Med5 meeting," Lamorgese said, "is a benchmark, especially in view of the upcoming EU Home Affairs Council meeting. The Ukrainian crisis has shown Europe's ability to act in synch and to express solidarity with those fleeing, and member states have been at the forefront in reception. In this new world order, in which the risk of a food crisis due to a naval blockade is not ruled out, today's meeting was a benchmark."

Concerns over increase in migrant landings from Africa

The concern, as the minister had already underscored, is that there may be an acceleration in landings on European coasts of boats carrying migrants from Africa.

As of June 3, over 20,000 landings had been recorded, and NGOs including Mediterranea have asked for more humanitarian corridors in the line of what was done for Ukrainian ones.

"We have confirmed to the two (EU) presidencies," Lamorgese said, "the outgoing and incoming ones, support for a gradual, step by step, approach on talks for a European Pact on Migration and Asylum. And we are convinced that this is the best method to seek solutions with a balance between responsibilities and the needed solidarity, which other members are called upon to show."

The minister then reiterated that the line of Mediterranean countries "must be based in part also on an adequate mechanism for the redistribution of a sufficient number spread among member states, to be effective."

She reiterated the unified position of Mediterranean countries, "which flanks the request to develop EU actions towards third countries, with partnerships to prevent the departure (of migrants) and collaboration on repatriation, in part through instruments with countries of origin and transit" for migrants.

 

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