returning refugees

The Danish government wanted to send refugee Aya Abo Daher, seen here with her high school principal, back to Syria | Photo: Rahima Abdullah
Turkish president Erdogan wants his AK party to win elections again in 2023 | Photo: picture alliance/Presidential Press Service
On 14 April 2022, UK Home Secretary Priti Patel (left) and Rwandan Foreign Minister Vincent Biruta (right) sign a new asylum agreement. | Photo: AP
Denmark's Minister for Immigration and Integration Mattias Tesfaye speaks to the press ahead of a EU Special Justice and Home Affairs Council on the response to the situation in Ukraine, at the European Council in Brussels, Belgium, 27 February 2022 | Photo: Stephanie Lecocq / EPA
Millions of Ukrainians have left their country, but some are beginning to return | Photo: picture-alliance/AP
Syria's Minister of Foreign Affairs and Expatriates Faisal Al-Mikdad (R) meets with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi (L) and the accompanying delegation in Damascus, Syria, 17 October 2021 | Photo: EPA/YOUSSEF BADAWI
The return of migrants from Spain to their home countries is meant to be guaranteed under Spain’s agreements with countries such as Morocco and Algeria, but if the deportation does not happen within 60 days, many of them end up being released | Photo: AP/Bernat Armangue
This sumer the Ufuk Turkish Association for Relief and Development provided activities for orphaned Syrian children in Gaziantep | Photo: Zakariya Yahya/picture-alliance
Deportations to Afghanistan are usually met with protests | Photo: picture-alliance/dpa/M. Balk
A deportation flight from Leipzig in July, 2019 | Photo: M. Kappeler/picture-alliance
Syrian refugees queue to receive aid and food supplies, at the Bardarash refugee camp, South of Duhok, Kurdistan region, Iraq, 21 October 2019 | Photo: EPA/Gailan Haji
Decades of war and conflict have left large swathes of urban areas uninhabitable | Photo: picture-alliance/AP Photo/R. Gul